Lord Richard Rogers of Riverside

Senior Partner, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

About Speaker

Richard Rogers is the 2007 Pritzker Architecture Prize Laureate, the recipient of the RIBA Gold Medal in 1985 and winner of the 1999 Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation Medal. He is also winner of the 2000 Praemium Imperiale Prize for Architecture, the 2006 Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement (La Biennale di Venezia) and the 2007 Tau Sigma Delta Gold Medal. Richard Rogers was awarded the Légion d’Honneur in 1986, knighted in 1991 and made a member of the House of Lords (the upper house of the UK Parliament) in 1996. In 2008 he was made a Member of the Order of the Companions of Honour. 

In 1995, he was the first architect invited to give the BBC Reith Lectures – a series entitled ‘Cities for a Small Planet’ – and in 1998 was appointed by the Deputy Prime Minister to chair the UK Government’s Urban Task Force on the state of English cities and their ability to provide 4 million new homes as well as their potential for revitalisation.

During 1980s and 90s, Richard was an advisor to President Francois Mitterand’s Grands Projets programme in Paris, and from 2000 – 03 he advised the Mayor of Barcelona’s Urban Strategies Council. From 2001 to 2008 he was chief advisor on Architecture and Urbanism to the first Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone. 

Richard has a wealth of experience in urban masterplanning, with major schemes in London, Berlin, Florence, New York and Shanghai Pudong. With Ivan Harbour, he has recently worked on a major masterplan for Barangaroo South - a mixed-use waterside development in Sydney, Australia - and participated in the Greater Paris project.

Richard was Chairman of the Tate Gallery and Deputy Chairman of the Arts Council of Great Britain, and is currently an Honorary Trustee of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Trustee of Doctors of the World UK and President of The National Communities Resource Centre. 

 

Events

Housing Futures

14:45 - 15:30 20 September 2018

This day of discussion and debate will consider possible futures for social housing. The current demolition of Robin Hood Gardens, and of numerous other estates across London, prompts a number of urgent questions: is state-run social housing dead?